SHTF Kit Planning: What to Have and Why – Part II

The Defensive Training Group

heavypacks.jpg-300x224

In Part I, here, we began to build the foundation for a SHTF kit at its cornerstone, good boots, and moved on to the pack itself, some pros and cons, and then to personal protection.  One thing we didn’t mention, and should have, was socks.  Good, quality socks, and at least 6 pair per person.  We like a merino wool blend, over the calf style, that wicks and is good for a minimum of 3 seasons.  3 season socks aren’t too heavy, and in winter, so long as you’re walking, your feet will stay comfortable.  It’s when you stop that you need the heavier type.  That said, we are HUGE ‘Vermont Darn Tough’ fans.  The particular model we like is the USMC “Darn Tough” over the calf, extra cushion type (model 1501).  They’re getting harder to find, and are expensive, but they’re well worth the cost.  YMMV.  They have…

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SHTF Kit Planning: What to Have and Why – Part I

The Defensive Training Group

overloaded

A picture’s worth a thousand words, isn’t it?  Try to imagine ‘bugging out’ with a lot of the crap that various sources tell you that you must have in order to survive, and soon, you’ll be in worse shape than the troop pictured above, God bless him.

We’ve held off on putting together a DTG specific ‘SHTF Kit’ (aka ‘Bug Out,’ Survival, and other names) because a metric crap ton of information on the subject is already available.  However, after reviewing what’s being accepted as ‘conventional wisdom,’ it has become apparent that as we focus on the “Neighborhood Protection Team” and local community aspect of preparedness, it’s time to throw in our two cents.  We’ll start at the very foundation of what should be viewed as survival gear in any kit:

Your Boots:   If your boots are garbage, you’re not walking far.  At all.  If they’re good boots, but…

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This is a test – It is ONLY a Test!

The Defensive Training Group

Productivity Counts!  There ain’t NO time to be simply layin’ about if you haven’t done something productive for ‘Team Freedom’!!

No matter what level of preparedness you’re at, you might consider kicking it up a notch.  Doing something.

If you can afford it, get a AR kit and build one (just this act alone causes 3,952 liberal heads to overfill with air and burst).

Palmetto has kits for $289 and lowers for $60.  Less than $350 for a ‘better than decent AR!’  The lower below is for someone I know purdy good.

Buy some more ammo!  I just picked up a case of 9mm 124gr Winchester FMJ from SG Ammo for $206 (less tax) shipped!

Go to the range and PRACTCE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

Re-do your kit!

Teach a kid to shoot an AR!

Teach anyone how to properly sharpen a knife!

Get some more non-perishable food and water filtration…

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Stuart Holroyd, Gnosticism, & the Occult Wave (Part II)

The Orthosphere

Holroyd Elements First and Only Edition of The Elements of Gnosticism

III. Holroyd’s case for Gnosticism remains nevertheless a measured one.  Unlike Pagels, Holroyd’s attitude is not, against Orthodoxy, an angry one.  In Elements, Chapter 1, in setting forth the common propositions of the numerous Gnostic systems, Holroyd remarks that “the idea that the world was the work of an incompetent or malevolent deity” figures among them.”  He adds that, “stated thus baldly, it seems a merely perverse idea, or an attempt to exonerate human iniquity by putting the blame on God.”  He immediately tries to downplay the perversity by explaining that the Gnostic systems posit two deities: The inferior Demiurge who, envying the creative potency of the superior deity, authors the botched world; and that selfsame superior deity, sometimes referred to as the Father.  Holroyd notes that the “transcendent God does not, and never did, act, in the sense of willing…

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Stuart Holroyd, Gnosticism, & the Occult Wave (Part I)

The Orthosphere

Holroyd Stuart Holroyd (born 1933)

The name of Stuart Holroyd (born 1933) is associated – if rather erroneously – with that British literary insurrection of the late 1950s, the “Angry Young Men.”  In fact, Holroyd and his two close associates, Colin Wilson and Bill Hopkins, differed strongly from the “Angries,” among whom the representative figures were John Osborne, Kingsley Amis, Harold Pinter, and Kenneth Tynan.  The “Angries” emphasized their politics, leaning strongly to the left; they assumed an ostentatiously materialistic viewpoint, wrote in self-righteous condemnation of the existing society, put ugliness on display, and tended towards an egocentric species of pessimism or nihilism.  Osborne’s Look Back in Anger, which enjoyed theatrical success in London in 1956, typifies the outlook of the “Angries”: It presents an English version of Jean-Paul Sartre’s bleak Existentialism, set in a universe devoid of meaning where, in Sartre’s phrase, “Hell is other people.”  Holroyd and Wilson…

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New study: belief in free will linked to ability to behave morally and to help others

WINTERY KNIGHT

Is it possible to choose to be moral if we are machines made out of meat? Is it possible to choose to be moral if we are machines made out of meat?

A while back I finished reading “God’s Crime Scene”, the new book by J. Warner Wallace. I wanted to post something about some studies he mentioned in Chapter 6, on free will. This is one of the places where he found evidence in a surprising area.

Wallace says that free will makes more sense if theism is true, because we have non-material souls that interact with our bodies, but are not causally determined by them. On atheism, only matter exists, and you can’t get free will (or consciousness) from matter. So atheists like Sam Harris and Alex Rosenberg, for example, deny free will, because they are materialists and atheists.

Anyway, here’s what he writes on p. 256:

In 2008, researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of British Columbia conducted experiments highlighting the relationship between a…

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